Biographical Notices of graduates of Yale College, Book

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Biographical Notices of graduates of Yale College. Including those graduated in classes later than 1815, who are not commemorated in the Annual Obituary Records

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CLASS OF 1816

REUBEN BOOTH, son of Reuben H . and Sarah Booth , was born in Newtown , Connecticut , on November 26 , 1794. The family removed to Kent in his boyhood , and he entered Yale at the opening of Sophomore year . In 1814 his father , who was a wool-carder, was drowned in the Housatonic River , leaving him dependent on his own exertions.

On graduation he began the study of law in New Milford with Judge David S . Boardman (Yale 1793), and after one year continued his studies with Moses Hatch (Yale 1800), while teaching in the Danbury Academy . In 1818 he was admitted to the bar , and opened an office in Danbury , where he remained through life . His practice was large and remunerative , and he also became one of the leading politicians of the State.

In 1822 he represented the town in the General Assembly , and from that date to 1835 he was the Judge of Probate for the Danbury District . In 1830 he was a member of the State Senate , and in 1844 and 1845 Lieutenant Governor.

He died in Danbury on August 14 , 1848 , in his 54th year , after an illness of two or three days.

He married Jane, daughter of the Rev. David Belden ( Yale 1785 ), of Wilton, who died on February 18, 1844, at the age of 45.

Their children were three daughters and two sons .

CLASS OF 1816

REUBEN BOOTH, son of Reuben H . and Sarah Booth , was born in Newtown , Connecticut , on November 26, 1794. The family removed to Kent in his boyhood , and he entered Yale at the opening of Sophomore year. In 1814 his father , who was a wool-carder, was drowned in the Housatonic River , leaving him dependent on his own exertions.
On graduation he began the study of law in New Milford with Judge David S . Boardman (Yale 1793), and after one year continued his studies with Moses Hatch (Yale 1800), while teaching in the Danbury Academy. In 1818 he was admitted to the bar , and opened an office in Danbury , where he remained through life . His practice was large and remunerative , and he also became one of the leading poli ticians of the State.
In 1822 he represented the town in the General Assembly , and from that date to 1835 he was the Judge of Probate for the Danbury District. In 1830 he was a member of the State Senate , and in 1844 and 1845 Lieutenant Governor.
He died in Danbury on August 14 , 1848 , in his 54th year , after an illness of two or three days.
He married Jane, daughter of the Rev. David Belden (Yale 1785), of Wilton, who died on February 18, 1844, at the age of 45.
Their children were three daughters and two sons .

JOHN STEINMETZ BRINTON, the eldest son of John Hill Brinton (Univ. Pa. 1790) and Sarah (Steinmetz) Brinton, of Philadelphia, was born in Philadelphia on July 20 , 1798 . A sister married his classmate McClellan.
His health began to fail during his College course , and this , together with his strong love of classical literature , delayed his professional studies . He spent about a year at Oxford University , and traveled on the Continent; but finally began his preparation for the bar in the office of Jonathan W . Coudy , of Philadelphia , and was admitted to practice.
He married on February 26, 1825, Adelaide, daughter of Isaac and Alida Gouverneur, of New York City. On the 8th of the following August she died in Philadelphia, of fever, and his death from the same fever followed on August 18, at the age of 27.

EPAPHRAS CHAPMAN, son of Isaac and Abigail (Brooks) Chapman , of East Haddam , Connecticut , was born on April 25 , 1792 .
On graduation he entered the Princeton Theological Seminary, where he remained between one and two years.
He then undertook , in the service of the United Foreign Missionary Society of New York , an exploration of the southwestern Indian country , with a view to the establishment of missions . On the strength of his report in 1819 , a mission to the Osages , in what is now Oklahoma , then Arkansas Territory , was resolved upon , and the Rev . William F. Vaill (Yale 1806) and Mr . Chapman were appointed missionaries.
He was married , on April 2, 1820, to Hannah Eliza Mansfield , third daughter of Deacon Solomon Fowler, of Northford, in (North) Branford, and four days later he was ordained as an evangelist by the Presbytery of New Brunswick .
He started immediately for his mission, and labored zealously until his death, after a few days ‘ illness, at the missionary station named Union , on Grand River, January 7, 1825, in his 33d year.
His wife died at her father’s house in June, 1843. He was a man of great simplicity of character and purity of purpose.

WILLIAM PITT CLEAVELAND, the eldest child of William Pitt Cleaveland (Yale 1793), of New London, Connecticut, was born on May 14, 1797.
After teaching school for a year in Virginia, he studied law with his father and settled in practice in his native city, where he attained eminence before his early death.
He married on February 19 , 1824 , Mary Sanford , third daughter of the late James Scott Dwight , of Springfield , Massachusetts , and Mary ( Sanford ) Dwight , by whom he had one daughter and one son .
He died in New London on February 5, 1841, in his 44th year. His widow died on November 2, 1854, in her 57th year.

JOSEPH LORD COIT, the only son of Wheeler and Hannah (Lord, Abel) Coit, of that part of Preston , Connecticut , which is now Griswold , was born on June 14 , 1796 . His mother was a granddaughter of the Rev . Dr. Benjamin Lord (Yale 1714); and a half-sister married Thomas Day (Yale 1797).
He studied law with Judge Zephaniah Swift (Yale 1778) , of Windham , but never practiced . He became a manufacturer in Preston , and died , unmarried , in Jewett City , on October 15 , 1836 , in his 41st year.

JOHN ALEXANDER CUTHBERT , the fifth child and second son of General John Alexander and Mary Dupré ( Hey ward ) Cuthbert, of Charleston and Beaufort , South Caro lina , was probably born in 1797 . A brother was graduated in 1813 .He settled on a plantation in Florida , and married there . No details of his death are known.

GEORGE YOUNGLOVE CUTLER, the youngest child of Younglove and Dothee (Stone) Cutler, of Watertown , Connecticut , was born on April 6, 1797. A sister married Holbrook Curtis (Yale 1807), and a half – brother was graduated here in 1829.
He studied law , and entered on practice in his native place. ,
He married , on May 29, 1821, Mary Ann Pomeroy , only daughter of Dr . Æneas Monson ( Yale 1780 ) , of New Haven , and subsequently removed hither.
Later he was induced to engage in the book business in New York City , with disastrous results ; so that , about 1829 , he went West , and settled in Western Illinois , on the Mississippi River , at the point later named Nauvoo . Here he established a land – agency , and was meeting with deserved success , when he died of bilious fever , on Sep tember 3 , 1834 , in his 38th year .
Besides two children who died in infancy, one daughter survived him.
His widow married , on August 15 , 1838 , Daniel Green Whitney, of Quincy , Illinois , where she died on July 7, 1844, in her 42d year.

ASHBEL DART, the eldest of fourteen children of Joseph and Sarah ( Hurd ) Dart , of Middle Haddam, in Chatham, Connecticut, was born on July 15, 1793.
He studied medicine , with Dr. Thomas Miner (Yale 1796) in Middletown , and in the Yale Medical School , where he received the degree of M . D . in the spring of 1818 . Later, he spent some time in the New York City Hospital , and then began practice , in Carthage , a village just outside of Rochester, New York.
After a few months , about 1819 or 1820 , he removed to Conneaut , in the northeastern corner of Ohio, where he applied himself laboriously and with success to professional business . He was also active in public matters , and for one year (1833) served as an Associate Judge of the Ashtabula County Court . He was also for some years Postmaster.
About 1837 , his health having become somewhat impaired , he gave up his practice , and was soon after appointed superintendent of the public works being constructed by the Government at the mouth of Conneaut Creek . He also went into mercantile business.
On October 28 , 1844 , he was stricken with paralysis , from the effects of which he died , on December 8 , in his 52d year.
He was never married.

Source Citation:

Dexter, Franklin B. 1913. Biographical Notices of graduates of Yale College. Including those graduated in classes later than 1815, who are not commemorated in the Annual Obituary Records. New Haven. https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001975655

Cite this page:

Dexter, Franklin Bowditch. 1913. "Biographical Notices of graduates of Yale College, Book." History of Higher Education. https://higheredhistory.gmu.edu/primary-sources/biographical-notices-of-graduates-of-yale-college-book/