History of the College of William and Mary from its foundation, 1660 to 1874

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History of the College of William and Mary from its foundation, 1660 to 1874

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TO all to whom these presents shall come, James Blair, of the city of Williamsburg, in the colony of Virginia, and Stephen Fouace of Chelsea, in the country of Middlesex, clerks, send greeting: Whereas their late Majesties, King William and Queen Mary, of blessed memory, being religiously inclined to promote the Studies of sacred Theology, Philosophy, Languages, and other good Arts and Sciences, to the end the church of Virginia might be supplied with a seminary of ministers of the gospel, and the youth of that country be piously  educated in good manners and learning, and the orthodox Christian faith, might be propagated among the Western Indians, at the humble suit of the general Assembly of the colony aforesaid, by their letters patents bearing date at Westminster the eighth day of February, in the fourth year of their reign, were pleased of their special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion to give license to certain trustees

The Transfer of the College of William and Mary in Virginia

TO all to whom these presents shall come, James Blair, of the city of Williamsburg, in the colony of Virginia, and Stephen Fouace of Chelsea, in the country of Middlesex, clerks, send greeting: Whereas their late Majesties, King William and Queen Mary, of blessed memory, being religiously inclined to promote the Studies of sacred Theology, Philosophy, Languages, and other good Arts and Sciences, to the end the church of Virginia might be supplied with a seminary of ministers of the gospel, and the youth of that country be piously  educated in good manners and learning, and the orthodox Christian faith, might be propagated among the Western Indians, at the humble suit of the general Assembly of the colony aforesaid, by their letters patents bearing date at Westminster the eighth day of February, in the fourth year of their reign, were pleased of their special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion to give license to certain trustees, to wit, Francis Nicholson, William Cole, Ralph Wormley, William Byrd, and John Lear, Esqrs,; James Blair, John Farnifold, Stephen Fouace, and Samuel Gray, clerks; Thos. Milner, Christopher Robinson, Charles Scarborough, John Smith, Benjamin Harrison, Miles Cary, Henry Hartwell, William Randolph, and Matthew Page, gentlemen; that they or the major part of them, or the longest livers of them,  might erect, found, and establish a certain general school, or perpetual college, of sacred Theology, Philosophy, Languages, and other good Arts and Sciences, consisting of one President, six masters or professors, and one hundred scholars, more or less, graduates and non-graduates, according to the ordinances and statues of the said college, by the said trustees, or the major part of them, in that behalf to be made and established, in a certain place upon the south side of York river, near York town, in the country of York, in the colony aforesaid; or if that place, for the unwholesomeness of the air, or any other cause should not be agreeable, in any other place within the said colony which to the General Assembly of the said colony should seem most convenient. And idd further grant that the said trustees, or the major part of them receive, hold, and enjoy manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, rectories, portions, annuities, pension, and advowsons of churches, with all other hereditaments, franchises and possessions whatsoever, as well spiritual as temporal, to the value of two thousand pounds by the year, and all goods, chattels, money, and personal estate whatsoever, of the gift of any person whatsoever, willing to give the same to this use, or any gifts, grants, assignments, legacies, or appointments whatsoever of them, or any of them, or any other well disposed persons: But to the express intent, and under this special trust, that they, the said trustees, or the major part of them, or the longest livers of them, should take and receive the premises, and dispose the same, or the rents, issues, and profits thereof, only for sustaining and defraying the expenses in erecting and fitting the buildings of and for the said intended college, and in ordaining the same with books and other convenient utensils, and other expenses to the said college pertaining, as to them, or the major part of them, should seem expedient, until the said college should be actually erected, founded and established.

And under this trust, and to the intent, that as soon as the said college, according to the royal design aforesaid, should be erected and founded, the said trustees, or the longest livers of the longest liver of them, and his or their heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, by good and sufficient writings and assurances in law, should give, grant, and transfer to the President, and masters, or professors, and their successors, the same manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, rectories, portions, annuities, pensions, and advowsons of churches, with all other hereditaments, franchises, possessions, goods, chattels, and personal estate aforesaid, or so much thereof as should not be expended and laid out in erecting the said college or in the other uses aforesaid. And by the said charter did make, create and establish the said James Blair first President of said college, during his natural life. And further, did grant that the said Francis Nicholson, Wm. Cole, Ralph Wormley, Wm. Byrd, John Lear, James Blair, John Farnifold, Stephen Fouace, and Samuel Gray, Thos. Milner, Christopher Robinson, Charles Scarborough, John Smith, Benjamin Harrison, Miles Cary, Henry Hartwell, William Randolph, and Matthew Page, and their successors, or the major part of them, should choose and nominate other able, fit, and capable persons into the places of the masters of professors of the said college; and that after the death of resignation, or deprivation of the said President, or professors, or any of them, they might from time to time, choose and substitute into his or their places some fit person or persons, according to the ordinances and statues of the same collegeā€¦

Source Citation:

Faculty of William and Mary. 1874. History of the College of William and Mary from its foundation, 1660 to 1874.

Cite this page:

Faculty of William and Mary. 1874. "History of the College of William and Mary from its foundation, 1660 to 1874." History of Higher Education. https://higheredhistory.gmu.edu/primary-sources/history-of-the-college-of-william-and-mary-from-its-foundation-1660-to-1874/