S. Dow’s Commercial Night Business School, Advertisement

Icon of a scroll with lines to indicate written text
Excerpt:

If the universal interest this School has created, the ability of the instructors, the testimony of so many intelligent citizens, and the largest and best class of patronage of any Business School in Baltimore, count for anything, its superiority must be acknowledged.

Come Monday night and hear the new method explained. Dwight S. Dow’s Commercial Night School is not a Business College. No!

The number of lessons is not limited. The School will be continued till the course of instruction is thoroughly completed and understood. See Course of Instruction on second page.

TERMS:
For Book-keeping, single and double entry, Business Forms, Penmanship, and Detecting Counterfeit Money, as promised in the Course of Instruction (including blank books for the course)……$20.00

NO MONEY
is required till you are satisfied the Course of Instruction will be successfully accomplished.

NO OTHER SCHOOL
in the country dare make such a proposition. It is done in this School because of the original and successful system of teaching getting results.

TUITION.
Books, board, and other expenses of attending any business college, will cost hundreds of dollars, and in none of these schools do the patrons receive so thorough and careful instruction and drilling in the logic of Book-keeping. Many Business College students never learn the reason why they make a debit and credit in journalizing, or know how to close a set of books and make out of a balance sheet by themselves, and understand it. In this School it is guaranteed that you can do these things thoroughly.

Dr. & Cr.
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1876, by Dwight S. Dow, in the office of the Librarian of
Congress, at Washington, D. C.
SAINT CLOUD BUILDING, 9th & F Streets, N. W., Monday Evening, December 8th, 1879.
Business Men, Young Ladies and Gentlemen who are interested in this New and Improved Method of Teaching, are cordially invited to attend the First Meeting of DWIGHT S. DOW’S COMMERCIAL NIGHT
SCHOOL, IN ST. CLOUD BUILDING. 9th & F Sts., Northwest,
Monday Evening, Dec. 8th, 1879.

If the universal interest this School has created, the ability of the instructors, the testimony of so many intelligent citizens, and the largest and best class of patronage of any Business School in Baltimore, count for anything, its superiority must be acknowledged.

Come Monday night and hear the new method explained. Dwight S. Dow’s Commercial Night School is not a Business College. No!

The number of lessons is not limited. The School will be continued till the course of instruction is thoroughly completed and understood. See Course of Instruction on second page.

TERMS:
For Book-keeping, single and double entry, Business Forms, Penmanship, and Detecting Counterfeit Money, as promised in the Course of Instruction (including blank books for the course)……$20.00

NO MONEY
is required till you are satisfied the Course of Instruction will be successfully accomplished.

NO OTHER SCHOOL
in the country dare make such a proposition. It is done in this School because of the original and successful system of teaching getting results.

TUITION.
Books, board, and other expenses of attending any business college, will cost hundreds of dollars, and in none of these schools do the patrons receive so thorough and careful instruction and drilling in the logic of Book-keeping. Many Business College students never learn the reason why they make a debit and credit in journalizing, or know how to close a set of books and make out of a balance sheet by themselves, and understand it. In this School it is guaranteed that you can do these things thoroughly.

[Drawn image of a male-presenting person wearing a suit and ties, with a flared white color. He is in
profile, and has a large mustache.]

BUSINESS MEN AT SCHOOL.
The best index of a school is the character of its scholars. Mr. Dow’s Baltimore class, representing many of the very best business houses in that city, is composed of men of many walks of life; and in age, experience, business standing and intelligence it is no exaggeration to say that they far excel the average of students in any other school or college. On our fourth page is published their indorsement of the school, voluntarily furnished, and so strongly worded as to give the most convincing evidence that the course and the method are all we claim them to be.

See Dow’s Success and who attend the Commercial Course in Baltimore; also what they say of it on the fourth page.

FROM WINFIELD SCOTT.
Extract from a Speech made by the Rev. Winfield Scott, of San Francisco, after Taking the Course, before the Students and friends of Dwight S. Dow’s Commercial Night School.

“The art of teaching consists, not in merely telling what you know, but in making pupils understand and readily receive the instruction. The true teacher forces his thoughts into the minds of his pupils, and arouses them to enthusiasm. The mind thus aroused is quick to perceive, ready to understand, and able to retain the knowledge imparted. Mr. Dow is a model teacher. He rouses his pupils to enthusiasm; he rushes his thoughts into them; they can not help understanding him. He understands thoroughly all the intricacies of his subject; he knows—and is able to give—the reason for everything he requires to be done. He is an analyst. He instructs, and never dogmatizes, furnishes every thing (except brains) necessary to make any young man understand Book-keeping; and his clearness, force and persistency will go far towards making even stupid men understand. The sharp-witted, level-headed, strong-willed man, who believes in achieving a destiny, will have no trouble in getting as perfect a knowledge of Bookkeeping, in the time he proposes, as it is possible to procure it.”

“Every other department of science and art is improving in methods and appliances, and there is a great demand for improvement in the methods of imparting education. Mr. Dow feels this necessity in his department. His experience of years has taught him by teaching his students together, and by the use of the blackboard, he can give all the ideas, principles, theories, and forms of Book-keeping in a few weeks, that under the old methods would require several months. By giving a little private attention to the slower ones, he is enabled to keep the class together and do efficient work. In about twelve years he has taught 7,000 students, and to-day he commands their enthusiastic endorsement.”

Eighteen of Dow’s Baltimore students have attended business colleges. They are his warmest friends, for they KNOW the claims of his new method are true. See fourth page.

Source Citation:

Dow, Dwight S. 1879. “S. Dow’s Commercial Night Business School.” Dr. and Cr. December 8, 1879. https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.0310280a/

Cite this page:

Dow, Dwight S.. 1879. "S. Dow’s Commercial Night Business School, Advertisement." History of Higher Education. https://higheredhistory.gmu.edu/primary-sources/s-dows-commercial-night-business-school-advertisement/