Officers and Students of William and Mary College 1836-1837, Catalogue

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Catalogue of the Officers and Students of William and Mary College, 1836-1837

Excerpt:

COURSE FOR THE DEGREE OF A. B.

The course necessary for the degree of A. B., comprises the Junior Moral Class, the Chemical Class, the Junior Mathematical Class, and the Class of National Law, entitled, the Junior Political, in the Junior year.

In the Senior year, the Senior Political; the Senior Mathematical, and the Natural Philosophical Classes.

COURSE FOR THE DEGREE OF A. M.

There is also a course established to be pursued by those who wish to obtain the degree of A. M. Any Student proposing to enter upon this course, must have taken the degree of A. B. in this College, or the same or some equivalent degree in some other College of equal standing; and must also be a proficient in the Latin Language. In pursuing this course the Student will read the books designated below, under the general supervision of the Professors, who will, by occasional examination, ascertain the extent of the proficiency of the Student.

MORAL AND POLITICAL DEPARTMENT.

Campbell’s Rhetoric, Whately’s Logic, Abercrombie’s Moral Philo- sophy, Montesquieu’s Spirit of Laws, Say and Ricardo on Political Economy, Brown on the Passions, Chalmer’s Evidences of Christianity.

HISTORICAL.

Gillies’ Greece, Ferguson’s Rome, Sismondi’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Russell’s Modern Europe, Hallam’s Middle Ages and Constitutional History of England—History of the United States.

MATHEMATICAL.

Legendre’s Geometry, Young’s and Bourdon’s Algebra, Young’s Analytical Geometry, Young’s Differential and Integral Calculus, Gum” mere’s Astronomy.

PHYSICAL.

Turner’s Chemistry, Young’s Mechanics, Newton’s Principia.

LAW DEPARTMENT.

Text Books on Constitutional Law.

              The Classical School consists of two departments. The first is adapted to Students who attend other classes in college, and are prepared to read the higher Greek and Latin authors. Instructions is also gien on the principles of general Grammar, Grecian and Roman Antiquities, Mythology and Ancient Geography.

              In the second department, which is distinct from the first, pupils will be received from the time of their commencing the rudiments of the Latin or Greek language. They are also instructed in English Grammar, Arithmetic, Ancient and Modern Geography and Writing. In this school as many teachers may be employed as circumstances render necessary.

MORAL AND POLITICAL DEPARTMENT.

Thomas R. Dew, Professor.

              The subjects in this department are divided into two courses:

              First- The Junior Moral, embracing Belles Lettres, Rhetoric, Logic, Composition, Moral Philosophy and History. Text books- Blair’s Lectures, Hedge’s Logic, Paley’s Moral Philosophy, Tyler’s Universal History (large edition) and Syllabus of Lectures on History, by the Professor.

              Second- The Senior Political Course, embracing political economy, Government and Philosophy of the Human Mind. Textbooks- Smith’s Wealth of Nations, Dew’s Lectures on the Restrictive System, and on Usury, Dew’s Essay on Slavery, and Brown’s Philosophy of the Human Mind.

              The Professor, at each meeting of the classes, is in the habit of explaining the text and making such additions as he deems necessary, upon all of which the student is afterwards rigidly examined; and when the nature of the subject requires it, he delivers independent lectures, upon which the student is likewise examined.

Lectures three times a week in each class.

Junior Moral Class,………………………………………..…………66

Senior Political Class, …………………………………………..…..26

Whole Number of Students in this department,……….92

CHEMISTRY

J. Millington, Professor

Textbook- Dr. Edward Turner’s Elements of Chemistry, 5th edition. The lectures are delivered three times a week during the session, in the Laboratory of the College, and are illustrated by all the necessary apparatus and instruments, the number of which has been considerably augmented by the Professor. The course commences with the Doctrines of Affinity, and an examination of the Imponderables, Heat, Light, Electricity, and Galvanism. This is followed by an investigation of the Laws and Theories of their combinations, throughout the whole of which, the Doctrines of Definite Proportions and Equivalent Numbers are particularly explained and exemplified. The examination of compounds by testing, and the methods of examining and working the metallic ores, as applicable to mining purposes, have considerable attention* The course concludes with Organic or Animal and Vegetable Chemistry, and the whole of it has rather a tendency to Geological and Mineral investigation, than to Pharmacy and Medicine. Experimental illustrations of all the above subjects are made before the class, and a private examination and comparison of what occurs at the lecture table, and what is stated in the textbook, is made at the conclusion of each distinct subject. The Professor is now engaged in making a collection of all the subjects described, in order that they may be laid before the students, for inspection or experiment. This will include an extensive Geological and Mineralogical Collection. Number of Students—78.

NATURAL PHILOSOPHY

J. Millington, Professor.

              Lectures three times a week during the session. Textbooks—Epi- tome of Mechanical Philosophy and on the Steam Engine, by the Professor—the Parts of the Library of Useful Knowledge which treat of Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, Electricity, Galvanism, Magnetism, Electro-Magnetism, Optics, and Optical Instruments, and Herschell’s Astronomy.

The subjects treated of are Mechanics, including Statics, and Dynamics, or the Doctrines of Weight, Force and Motion; the Mechanic Powers and their practical application to the construction of Machines; Friction, Pneumatics, Acoustics, Meteorology, Hydrostatics, Specific Gravities, Hydraulics, with applications to Pumps, Water Wheels, &c.; the Steam Engine, Electricity, Galvanism, Magnetism, Electro-Magnetism; Optics in Theory, and as applied to the construction of Optical Instruments, and Descriptive Astronomy.

These subjects are first examined by experimental illustrations and diagrams, and their several important applications to useful and manufacturing processes pointed out, and are afterwards recapitulated with such illustrations, only, as serve to explain their powers and mathematical principles. Examinations of the students take place at the conclusion of each distinct subject, independent of the general examinations at the conclusion of the course. Number of Students—29

CIVIL ENGINEERING

J. Millington, Professor.

Regular Lectures three times a week during the session, and occasional practical exercises. Text book—a new Treatise on Civil Engineering, Practical and Mathematical, now in course of publication, by the Professor. The subjects taught, are, the principles of plotting or drawing plans; the theory and practice of Mensuration, Land Surveying, Levelling and draining land; the nature and qualities of Building Materials; working Stone Quarries; making Bricks; burning Lime, Cements, &c.; mode of carrying on Earth Work, or Excavation, with the methods of setting out and measuring the same; Road Making, common, McAdam’s paved; investigation of the strength of Materials; methods of Build- ing in Brickwork and Masonry; Principles of Scientific Carpentry; Iron Foundry and Smith’s Work; the construction of Roofs and centering for large Stone Arches. The Theory of Arches; Timber Bridges; the methods of building in water, for the construction of Bridges, Harbors, Break-waters, &r.; of Cast Iron Bridges, and Suspension Bridges; the method of drawing specifications of particulars for work to be executed, and of making estimates of the expense of carrying such works into execution. Applications of the foregoing principles to the construction of Navigable Canals, and Locks—to Rail Roads—to Water and Wind Mills—to Steara Engines—locomotive Engines for Rail Roads — to the working of Mines—the supplying towns with water, and illuminating the same by Inflammable Gas Works.

The above course is founded on the practical experience of the Professor, who for twenty-five years, followed the profession of a Civil Engineer in England—and who was appointed to the Professorship of Civil Engineering in the University of London. Number of Students—25.

MATHEMATICS

Robert Saunders, Professor.

There are in this department two Classes,

In the Junior Class of Mathematics, are taught the following subjects: Algebra, as far as Equations of the second degree; Plane and solid Geometry and Mensuration; Plane Trigonometry and its application to the measurement of inaccessible Heights and Distances and Land Surveying.

The exercises in this Class consist of strict examination of each student upon the text book, accompanied by such explanations and additions by the Professor, as the subject requires. The use of Instruments is also taught, which comprises practical Land Surveying, Text books — Day’s Algebra, Legendre’s Geometry, Gummere’s Surveying. Lectures three times a week.

The Senior Class of Mathematics are instructed in the following subjects: Equations of the higher degrees. Surds, Analytical Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry, including Conic Sections, Differential and Integra! Calculus, and the application of Spherical Trigonometry, to Nautical Astronomy. The exercises are conducted as in the Junior Class. Text Books—Cambridge Trigonometry, Cambridge Calculus, and Gummere’s Astronomy.

Lectures three times a week.

Whole number of Students in this department—80.

NATIONAL LAW.

Beverly Tucker, Professor.

The exercises of this Class consist of recitations from the text, accompanied by explanations, and Lectures by the Professor. Text book—Vattel’s Law of Nations. The subject extends over half the College course only.

Lectures three times a week.

Number of Students—34.

MUNICIPAL LAW

Beverly Tucker, Professor.

The Text Books of this Class, are Tucker’s Commentary, Stephen on Pleading, and Starkie on Evidence. The Federalist, Kents’s Lectures on Constitutional Law, and Madison’s Resolutions and Report of 1798-9. The subject of Municipal Law alone, constitutes an entire course. The manner of lecturing, is to require the Student to read a portion of the text book, which becomes the subject of question, explanation and conversation at the next meeting. A sort of moot court is contrived by devising cases which the students are required to conduct to issue; and which are generally so managed as to lead to an issue of law; on which briefs are handed in, argument heard, if necessary, and judgments pronounced. This is merely used as un exercise in pleading, and a task of research and study on the argument of the demurrer. It presents nothing to vanity or ambition, and is a dry, severe and practical task. Lectures three times a week.

The subject of Constitutional Law occupies a separate half course, commencing after the 22nd of February. It is prefaced by some ten or a dozen Lectures on the Philosophy of Government, and then goes on into a critical examination of the Constitution, the contemporaneous exposition by the writers of the Federalist, the Commentary of Chancellor Kent, and the Virginia Resolutions.

Lectures three times a week.

 Number of Students—14.

COURSE FOR THE DEGREE OF A. B.

The course necessary for the degree of A. B., comprises the Junior Moral Class, the Chemical Class, the Junior Mathematical Class, and the Class of National Law, entitled, the Junior Political, in the Junior year.

In the Senior year, the Senior Political; the Senior Mathematical, and the Natural Philosophical Classes.

COURSE FOR THE DEGREE OF A. M.

There is also a course established to be pursued by those who wish to obtain the degree of A. M. Any Student proposing to enter upon this course, must have taken the degree of A. B. in this College, or the same or some equivalent degree in some other College of equal standing; and must also be a proficient in the Latin Language. In pursuing this course the Student will read the books designated below, under the general supervision of the Professors, who will, by occasional examination, ascertain the extent of the proficiency of the Student.

MORAL AND POLITICAL DEPARTMENT.

Campbell’s Rhetoric, Whately’s Logic, Abercrombie’s Moral Philo- sophy, Montesquieu’s Spirit of Laws, Say and Ricardo on Political Economy, Brown on the Passions, Chalmer’s Evidences of Christianity.

HISTORICAL.

Gillies’ Greece, Ferguson’s Rome, Sismondi’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Russell’s Modern Europe, Hallam’s Middle Ages and Constitutional History of England—History of the United States.

MATHEMATICAL.

Legendre’s Geometry, Young’s and Bourdon’s Algebra, Young’s Analytical Geometry, Young’s Differential and Integral Calculus, Gum” mere’s Astronomy.

PHYSICAL.

Turner’s Chemistry, Young’s Mechanics, Newton’s Principia.

LAW DEPARTMENT.

Text Books on Constitutional Law.

TABLE OF EXPENSES.

Expenses of a regular Student, (i.e.) one who studies for a degree.

JUNIOR YEAR

Board, including washing, fuel, &c.$130.00
Fees to three Professors, $20 each,60.00
Fee to the Professor of National Law, (half course,)10.00
Matriculation fee,6.00
 $205.00

SENIOR YEAR.

Board, as before,$130.00
Fees to three Professors,60.00
Matriculation5.00
 $195.00

The fee to the Professor of Law, is $20

Civil Engineering, – 20

Higher Classics, – 20

Those students studying for the degree of A. M., will pay to each Professor whose department he attends, $20 for the course.

Every student, whether regular or irregular, pays the same for board and matriculation fee; and pays a fee ($20) for each class that he attends, unless he has attended it before; in which case, he attends the’ class without fee.

In order to guard against the injurious tendency of the incurring of debts by students while at College, the Visitors, at their annual meeting in July, 1836, adopted the following resolution: “Resolved, That it is highly expedient that the practice of students buying on credit should be stopped ; and, therefore, that the President be directed to endeavor to obtain the consent and a formal pledge of the the merchants and dealers of Williamsburg, not to furnish commodities in any case to a student, on credit, unless by the written authority of the parent or guardian, communicated through the Faculty; and it is made the duty of the President, should his application be rendered unsuccessful by the refusal to give such pledge, or a violation of it, if given, to correspond with the guardians or parents of the young men at college, advising them to give explicit instructions to their wards or sons, not to deal, either in cash or oh credit, with any such merchant or dealer.” In consequence of which, most of the merchants of the place entered into the required pledge.

All Students of Theology, studying for the Ministry, are, by a resolution of the Faculty, admitted without fee to all the lectures, as well as ta instruction in the classical department.

Source Citation:

William and Mary College. 1837. Catalogue of the Officers and Students of William and Mary College, 1836-1837. Institutional Document. Petersburg: Office of the Farmers’ Register. https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/bitstream/handle/10288/13506/catalogueofoffic1837coll.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Cite this page:

William and Mary College. 1837. "Officers and Students of William and Mary College 1836-1837, Catalogue." History of Higher Education. https://higheredhistory.gmu.edu/primary-sources/catalogue-of-the-officers-and-students-of-william-and-mary-college-1836-1837/